The analytics of learning – what is that? Who is affected? More importantly, why should I care?

The answer to all of those valid questions have been provided in a great post by Andrianes Pinantoan on the Edudemic site.

At an extremely high level, Learning Analytics involve four basic steps:

1. Collecting large amounts of data from a number of channels – including, but not limited to, online learning environments, social, mobile – and perhaps in the future, games. Couple this data with various learning theories and we can begin to form a more holistic picture of a student’s learning progress than just theories.

2. Translating that data into actionable insights. It may be impossible to track how much a student really absorbed from one lesson but the system CAN track his/her behaviour and use that as a signal.

3. Personalization and adaptation. Once the system gets the signal, it can then personalize each student’s learning environment. For example, if a student spends significantly less time attempting to solve a problem compared to other students, the system can display prompts and clues to keep him/her going – in real time.

4. Predicting the best course in the future. As students use the system for a prolonged period of time, educators will be able to track what works and what doesn’t – and adjust accordingly. In fact, it will soon be possible for each student to essentially be working with a custom-built and personalized curriculum that’s unique to them.

So that answers the What question. The How is detailed in the infographic below.

Learning Analytics: Leveraging Education Data – An infographic by the team at Open Colleges

BTW – I felt compelled to include this data on THE Tech Scoop, not only because one of the graphic creators forwarded it to me, but primarily because many that know me know that I come from an education-centric family and profession; with both my wife and father-in-law in public school administration, and my past life deploying the PowerSchool Student Information System (when we were part of the education division at Apple).

I would love your thoughts on this phenominon being described as Learning Analytics.

Image via: whicheb5.com